Mdundo.com

Business is booming for music streaming platforms in these times of the coronavirus pandemic which has forced millions across the globe to stay indoors. Streaming site Mdundo.com reports over 4.5 million downloads in the four weeks ending March 22nd.

In the reporting period of March 1st to 22nd 2020, Mdundo revealed that the company witnessed an increase over over 350,000 downloads, with an 8.8% week on week increase during this ‘work from home’ period.

It’s a trend that may not be slowing down anytime soon; what with full or partial government lockdowns and restrictive movement either in effect, or impending, in a host of African countries such as South Africa, Rwanda, Ghana, Nigeria, Kenya and Tanzania, in efforts to curb the spread of COVID-19. People across the globe are consuming more multimedia entertainment now more than ever before.

According to Similarweb, applications with live-stream capabilities, as well as entertainment offerings, have risen up the ranks to the most downloaded on Google Play and Apple Store. In the list of top 50 most downloaded applications in Kenya and Tanzania are Instagram, Xender, Netflix, Viusasa, Facebook Lite, Boomplay, Azam TV and YouTube Go.

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Artists are also not being left behind, what with concerts and tours all but paused for the second quarter of the year, entertainers have had to resort to more innovative ways of staying in touch with fans and audiences. Live streams and digital sessions have become the norm, with DJs posting live mixing sessions on their Instagram and Facebook accounts, and artists resorting to online launches and listening parties for new albums and singles.

Once such example is Nyashinski, who posted this week on his social media pages that he would be dropping his new album ‘Lucky You’ during a live stream session to be broadcast on his Instagram page.

While the question may not be so much whether the trend will remain the same, but what new innovations the entertainment industry and its custodians will have to come up with in order to adapt to a new world order of the way in which people interact with art.